3/24/17

The House At Pooh Corner - Now We Are Six (Wonderland Records, 1974)

Here is an interesting rarity, especially in the D*sney-glutted world that we now find ourselves living in.  (I swear, if they ever buy Lego, I'm leaving the planet.)

The good news is, here are some Pooh stories--side one contains the famous Blustery Day, as well as the equally famous arrival of Tigger; side two contains poems and songs from NOW WE ARE SIX--that are completely devoid of any D*sney-fication.  In other words, probably closer to what was originally intended (which I have always pictured as a sort of Wind In the Willows-type of calm elegance).
The further good news is, somebody (probably not Wonderland, if history teaches us anything) spent some money on it, between a cast and an orchestra.
The bad news is, I didn't like it much.  Personally, I found most of the voices either grating, or just very wrong.  There was a moment in the first side, even,  that I suspected it was all the same person, who wasn't doing a very good job trying to come up with more voices (especially Piglet).  By the time I got to side two,where an attempt has been made to put most of the contents to music, everything became a cloying, sing-songy mess.
Now, your mileage may vary, and I certainly hope it does.  You may have grown up with this record, and I'm sure I would like it much better if I had done the same.  In the end, to me, it's really more of an oddity for my growing record collection.  (Oh, by the way, eagle-eyed viewers will notice the VHS sticker at the corner of the front cover! I can assure you there is no video component to our presentation.)
LINK:  House At Pooh Corner - Now We Are Six (Wonderland, 1974)

2 comments:

Brian said...

My mother had a copy of the book Now we are six and read it to my brother and me at bedtime.

Sampoerna Quatrain said...

The original books are stellar, charming, and eternal. I have a hardcover set of them myself. I suppose we owe D*sney something for keeping the characters within the public perception, but I think without them the books would still be held as classics.